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Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Mass

Time: 12 pm to 12:30 pm

Contact: Ken Weber · kweber@loyno.edu · 5048653167

Location: Ignatius Chapel, 1st Floor, Bobet Hall

Delta Sigma Theta Window Program

Time: 12:30 pm to 2 pm

Contact: Dale O'Neill · dmoneill@loyno.edu · 504.865.3622

 
 
Delta Sigma Theta Window Program

 

Panhellenic Association Educational Program

Time: 12:30 pm to 2 pm

Contact: Dale O'Neill · dmoneill@loyno.edu · 504.865.3622

Location: Audubon Room, 2nd Floor, Danna Center

Panhellenic Association Educational Program

Biology Research Seminar: Antioxidant and shielding compounds in various plant species

Time: 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

Contact: Mona Wolfe · rkwolfe@loyno.edu · 865-2288

Location: Monroe Hall Room 610

Join us for a presentation given by Dr. Susanne Neugart. Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops. Grossbeeren, Germany.

The Psychology of Passing or Failing Any Bar Exam: Workshop For 3L and 4L Students, daytime session

Time: 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

Contact: Sarah Johnson · acadsup@loyno.edu · 504-861-5981

Location: College of Law, Broadway Campus, Room 405

This is a workshop on how to be mentally ready to study for any bar exam. During the workshop, Bar Preparation Department Director Suzanne Scalise will talk to you about what to expect while studying for several months, how to prepare now, and how to combat some issues that frequently arise.

 

Physics SPS Seminar: Why Einstein being wrong might be good?

Time: 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

Contact: Wendy Porche · wporche@loyno.edu · 3647

Location: Monroe Hall 152

PRESENTATION GIVEN BY: DR. ARNALDO VAGAS

Tittle:  Why Einstein being wrong might be good? 

The principle of relativity is one of the most fundamental principles of physics.  This principle can be understood as the statement that the results of any experiment are independent of the absolute orientation and velocity of the experiment.   In recent years physicists have suggested that the principle of relativity might be violated. One of the motivations for this possibility is that some of theories that attempt to unify the ideas of quantum mechanics and Einstein’s theory of general relativity might naturally allow for deviations from the principle of relativity.  Another motivation is the unexplained asymmetry on the amount of matter and antimatter observed in the universe.  Our most successful description of how elementary particles interact with each other suggests that we can predict the behavior of antimatter by studying the behavior of matter, however this theory fails to explain why we observe significantly more matter than antimatter in the universe. This matter-antimatter asymmetry could imply that the behavior of antimatter might be quite different from what is expected from our understanding of the fundamental interactions  and theories that deviate from the principle of relativity can easily reproduce an anomalous behavior for antimatter.  In this talk we will discuss what it means to break the principle of relativity and what kind signals experimentalists need to look for if they want to test this principle. 

Pizza and drinks will be served.  Please arrive 10 minutes early.

 

Project Shift: “What Should Be Done” To “What Can Be Done”

Time: 12:30 pm to 1:30 am

Contact: ODS Staff · ods@loyno.edu · 504-865-2990

Location: St. Charles Room, 1st Floor, Danna Center

Panel discussion led by Dr. Sybol Cook Anderson, Chief Diversity Officer, Ri Voelker, ODS Director, Samantha Pollard and Dario Bayardo, ODS Special Needs Counselors.

With an almost singular focus on legal compliance, disability service offices typically lead their institutions to consider “what must be done” rather than “what can be done.” This emphasis may keep the disability services office, and by turn the campus, stuck in a compliance narrative that promotes a response based on an obligation rather than one based on the values of equity and inclusion. Learn how Loyola’s ODS is in a process of analyzing current practices through a lens of social justice informed by disability studies scholarship as an alternative to basing their work on legal compliance.

The Psychology of Passing or Failing Any Bar Exam: Workshop For 3L and 4L Students, evening session

Time: 5 pm to 5:50 pm

Contact: Sarah Johnson · acadsup@loyno.edu · 504-861-5981

Location: College of Law, Broadway Campus, Room 405

This is a workshop on how to be mentally ready to study for any bar exam. During the workshop, Bar Preparation Department Director Suzanne Scalise will talk to you about what to expect while studying for several months, how to prepare now, and how to combat some issues that frequently arise.

"Complexity and Contradiction in Diocletian’s Palace"

Time: 8 pm to 9 pm

Contact: Connie Rodriguez · rodrigue@loyno.edu · 865.2287

Location: Whitney Bank Presentation Room, Thomas Hall

 

A Lecture by

Dr. Goran Nikšić

City of Split, Service for the Old City Core,

Obala kneza Branimira

The Charles Eliot Norton Memorial Lectureship of the AIA

free admission and free parking on campus (West Road Garage and the Horseshoe)

Co-sponsored by the Department of Classical Studies and the New Orleans Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

The meaning of Diocletian’s Palace has been oversimplified in most of scientific research during the past two centuries. Although the original purpose of this building has recently been established as the imperial manufacture of textiles, the consequences of such new historical approach on the understanding of the architecture have not been contemplated. The well-known interpretation of the Palace as a classical monument is being substituted with an analysis based on Venturi’s terms, describing the complexity and contradiction of the building on both formal and functional levels. The general design is both schematic and intricate, utilitarian and symbolic. Architectural elements depart from their usual treatment – columns support themselves and are decorative rather than structural, spaces are at the same time open and enclosed. On the functional level there is a clash between the industrial and domestic use, between the profane and sacred, proletarian and imperial. However, these contradictions and ambiguities were not intentional; they are a result of the pragmatic procedure of the architect obliged to solve the seemingly incompatible requirements by the emperor. Following many centuries of constant change and adaptation to the demands of a living city, today the Palace is faced with a challenge of being reduced to a mere tourist attraction. Understanding of the real meaning of the place as a complex, ambiguous and contradictory building could help rectify such a one-dimensional view.

Mass

Time: 9 pm to 9:30 pm

Contact: Ken Weber · kweber@loyno.edu · 5048653167

Location: Ignatius Chapel, 1st Floor, Bobet Hall