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Monday, April 8, 2019

Music Education Series: Expertise in Music Learning - Dr. Robert Duke

Time: 4 am to 6 am

Contact: Dr. Ed McClellan · emcclell@loyno.edu

Location: Communications/Music Complex, Room 204G

Robert Duke presents a lecture as part of the the 11th Annual Music Education Lecture Series. Dr. Duke is the Marlene and Morton Meyerson Centennial Professor and Head of Music and Human Learning at the University of Texas at Austin. The mission of the Music Education Lecture Series has been to enrich the intellectual and cultural life of Loyola University students, faculty, the university community, and music teachers in the Greater New Orleans community at large by bringing distinguished individuals in the music education profession to campus for presentations on specialized subjects. In recent years, the series has grown to bring music education scholars in residence.
 
Dr. Duke and his research team have completed extensive research on motor skill development, motor control, and perception in relation to observations of artist-level musicians engaged in individual practice. The goal of this research is premised on the longstanding notion that novice experience in any domain should resemble the day-to-day expereinces of experts, is to create a model of expert music practice that explains the processes through which artist-level musicians acquire and maintain their skills and informs the structure of practice by young musicians. Dr. Duke's research suggests that the development of artistry requires habits of behavior, thought, and perceptual acuity that are central to musicians' success. In effect, experts' conceptions of beauty and expressivity serve to focus attention on the physical and auditory goals of performance and thus provide hierarchy for the goals of music practice.
 
Updates to this event will be posted at presents.loyno.edu as information becomes available.

Admitted Student Day

Time: 9 am to 2 pm

Contact: Nikita Milton · namilton@loyno.edu · 5048653240

Location: Danna Student Center

Admitted Student Day is for newly admitted students and families entering in 2019-2020.

11th Annual Student's Peace Conference

Time: 12:30 pm to 2 am

Contact: Behrooz Moazami · bmoazami@loyno.edu · 5048653940

Location: Nunemaker Auditorium, 3rd Floor, Monroe Hall

To start the 11th Annual Student Peace Conference, 'The Other America', begins with a luncheon presentation "Hope, Marginalized Identiy, and Creativity" by Samantha Ammons and Regina Nicosia.

Lunch will be provided. 

LIM Presents: Cultivating Inter-Generational Ministries

Time: 6:30 pm to 8 pm

Contact: Tom Ryan · tfryan@loyno.edu · 504.865.2066

Location: Monroe Hall Room 401

A Presentation and Conversation.  April 8th, 6:30 p.m. 

Attend on campus or online 

Please RSVP at:     https://goo.gl/6g2D6n

Tenebrae Service

Time: 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Contact: Ken Weber · kweber@loyno.edu · 5048653167

Location: Holy Name of Jesus Church

While the liturgies of Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, and Good Friday offer many opportunities to contemplate the events of Christ’s suffering and death, Tenebrae focuses our attention on the inner drama of the Passion. Dating from the 7th or 8th Century, Tenebrae—from the Latin word for “shadows”—is a Holy Week prayer service steeped in tradition. Through psalms and readings gathered from the Liturgy of the Hours, Tenebrae enables us to meditate on the grief, abandonment, and betrayal Jesus experienced as the darkness of his impending death took hold.

Circus Mosaics and the Realities of Roman Chariot Racing

Time: 8 pm to 9:30 pm

Contact: Karen · Rosenbecker · krosenbe@loyno.

Location: Thomas Hall--Whitney Presentation Room

Going to the Games in Glorious Technicolour: Circus Mosaics and the Realities of Roman Chariot Racing

The AIA New Orleans Society presents--

Hazel Dodge, Trinity College Dublin

Co-sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America, The Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and Loyola University Classical Studies Program