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Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Physics Events

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Physics SPS Seminar: Why Einstein being wrong might be good?

Time: 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

Contact: Wendy Porche · wporche@loyno.edu · 3647

Location: Monroe Hall 152

PRESENTATION GIVEN BY: DR. ARNALDO VAGAS

Tittle:  Why Einstein being wrong might be good? 

The principle of relativity is one of the most fundamental principles of physics.  This principle can be understood as the statement that the results of any experiment are independent of the absolute orientation and velocity of the experiment.   In recent years physicists have suggested that the principle of relativity might be violated. One of the motivations for this possibility is that some of theories that attempt to unify the ideas of quantum mechanics and Einstein’s theory of general relativity might naturally allow for deviations from the principle of relativity.  Another motivation is the unexplained asymmetry on the amount of matter and antimatter observed in the universe.  Our most successful description of how elementary particles interact with each other suggests that we can predict the behavior of antimatter by studying the behavior of matter, however this theory fails to explain why we observe significantly more matter than antimatter in the universe. This matter-antimatter asymmetry could imply that the behavior of antimatter might be quite different from what is expected from our understanding of the fundamental interactions  and theories that deviate from the principle of relativity can easily reproduce an anomalous behavior for antimatter.  In this talk we will discuss what it means to break the principle of relativity and what kind signals experimentalists need to look for if they want to test this principle. 

Pizza and drinks will be served.  Please arrive 10 minutes early.